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European International Tops

Andreas Möller – Germany 96′

A legend with Die Mannschaft, Andreas Möller has won it all from the World Cup in 1990 to the Champions League in 1997. After starting his career in 1885 with Eintracht Frankfurt, he would move to Borussia Dortmund for just over one million euros. This would be his first spell at Borussia Dortmund where he would leave after his contract expired only winning the DFB-Pokal during his two years before returning to Frankfurt. After leaving Dortmund, Möller would be called up for the Italia 90 World Cup which West Germany would go on to win in the final against Argentina. This would be the last tournament for West Germany before it would be reunified with East Germany.

After leaving Frankfurt for a second time, Möller would this time end up in Italy with a Juventus team that would consist of Roberto Baggio, Paolo Di Canio, David Platt and Antonio Conte. In his first season with The Old Lady Andreas would win the UEFA Cup, beating his previous employers, Borussia Dortmund, 3-1 at the Westfalenstadion and 3-0 at the Stadio delle Alpi with Moller scoring in the second leg.

Juventus came second in the Serie A and quarterfinalists in the UEFA Cup so with Möller being trophyless he would return to Germany with a second stint at Borussia Dortmund where he would go on to win two Bundesliga titles and a Champions League. During the 1994/95 first round of the UEFA Cup, Moller scored the only goal of the first leg when Borussia Dortmund played Motherwell which is where Dortmund would first spot future signing Paul Lambert.

Where Möller is mostly remembered however would be when he scored the decisive penalty against England in the semi-final of Euro 96 as Germany would go on to lift the trophy. Over his career, the German international would be capped eighty-five times for his country, scoring twenty-nine goals.

Euro 96 would be where this Germany home top would be showcased in front of the world. This top has so much detail throughout it, showing off different sizes of the German Football Association logo in vertical stripes. The collar, cuffs and stars above the badge are all in the colours of the Germany flag with a small flag in between in buttons of the shirt. The shirt would not be complete if it were not for the iconic adidas stripes running down each sleeve with the black stripes contrasting along the white shirt. The number seven is not featured on the front of this jersey as this top was used in a German friendly rather than a major tournament as shown in the the photos above.


1 2 5 7 9 11 14 1970's 1990's 2000's Adidas Admiral Australia Black Blue Borussia Dortmund Celtic Claret and Amber Croatian Diadora England English European Everton Germany Green Hummel International Ipswich Town Italian Macron Motherwell Netherlands Nike Orange Puma Rangers Red Scotland Scottish Umbro Wales White Xara Yellow